Father of the Bride

Congratulations, your daughter is getting married! You will soon be a father-in-law!
Being the Father of the Bride is a wonderful time for most men, but it can also be challenging when the reality of the whole event hits home. There can be confusion as to exactly what the role entails and how to assert one’s own idea of how it should be. There is the challenge of the Father of the Bride speech. And no matter who gives it, it’s a great start to know what the traditional expectations are, so that you can decide what you will a dopt and what you will choose to say. Will nerves be a problem? Might emotion get in the way of a great speech?

If you know a Father of the Bride facing these challenges, give him The Father of the Bride Pack

Learn what the traditional duties are for the Father of the Bride and the traditional structure of the Father of the Bride speech, then use the suggestions to create your own. Includes ways to overcome nerves and emotion on the day, where to find stories, and supports to use and tips on public speaking and storytelling in gerneral. => http://bit.ly/OCsutM

Public Speaking – 7 Types of Humor You Can Use

In public speaking, the ability to use humor is an important skill to possess whatever your natural ability is. Most people like to smile, to laugh, or to enjoy a listening experience. Humor adds sparkle and interest to a speech. Humor when used should be good willed and not given in a manner to show how witty you are.
It is probably impossible to catalog humor completely. Here I have listed the 7 kinds of humor commonly used in public speaking.

Turn of Phrase

In this type of humor, you get the laugh by starting to make a serious point in one direction and suddenly an unexpected meaning is revealed. Mark Twain used this technique when he said that “youth is such a wonderful thing, it is shame to waste it on children.”

The Pun

A word is used to evoke a serious meaning and then used in a completely different meaning altogether. The second meaning gives a whole new viewpoint to the speaker’s remarks. To be funny the meaning should not be stretched too far or it will evoke groans rather than smiles. For example, the organiser of an event may ask a member of the audience if the guest speaker was an able speaker. The member of the audience may reply “Yes, the guest speaker was able. He was able to stand up all the way through his speech.”

Exaggeration

This is where a small thing is made into a larger important issue. This is similar to the how a cartoonist will exaggerate the features of a politician for effect.

Understatement

This is the opposite of exaggeration, and words are used to underplay the importance of an event or issue.
Irony
Here, the face value meaning of the words is different to the intended meaning. An example is the phrase “as pleasant and relaxed as a coiled rattlesnake” used by Kurt Vonnegut in one of his books.
Sarcasm
Sarcasm is a cutting form of wit and should be used with care. To be funny the audience should not have much sympathy for the intended target. If they do it will not work in your favor.

Satire

Satire is an attack upon something worded in a way as to be pleasant but clear in its meaning. Will Rogers at a bankers convention asked “I have often wondered where the Depositor’s hold their convention.”
To be funny, the humor should be said in a spirit of fun. However, for best effect, humor should be unannounced and told with a straight face (you don’t want to laugh before your audience does). It requires more practice and preparation than other parts of your speech. The humor will die if you fumble over words or stumble during the punch line. In public speaking, as it is with conversation, the telling of humor should be effortless and natural.

To be effective in public speaking the humor should be relevant to the points being made. It is woven into the fabric of the speech. With practice and preparation it is possible to employ the 7 types of humor listed, regardless of how dry and shy you maybe.

……………………………………………………………
Author: Edward Hope … Add interest to your your public speaking and conversation with “The Art of Great Conversation.” To claim your free preview visit http://www.SelfConfidentSpeaking.com

Pivotal Gold rewards this week – articles and discounted books

For Gold members

13% off Kathy Reichs’ latest – “Bones are Forever

Links to the articles

How to have better family conversations
Sadly, many families and groups of friends who come together during the holiday season have only superficial conversations. However, by using some simple agreements and some questions as conversation-starters, they can have a much richer and more enjoyable time of sharing their life experiences.
First, what gets in the way?
Five main impediments to quality family conversations:
 
Public Speaking Tips: More Hiding Places for Your Notes
1. I sometimes place a chair, back to audience, next to my prop or projection table. I may take off my
 coat and place it over the chair, but I also use the chair back to tape up notes, or even put them in the seat.

Learn How to Control Anger in a Relationship
Keep in mind that anger is controllable and a choice that you can choose to do something about if you want. If you tell your spouse or partner when you are angry, then it will help avoid a situation that could be otherwise pushed to the boiling point.
Are you beginning to see how choosing to control your anger is an important first step?

For Pivotal Gold + Members only

43% off the bestselling “The Age of Miracles” by Karen Thompson Walker

Public Speaking – 7 Types of Humor You Can Use

In public speaking, the ability to use humor is an important skill to possess whatever your natural ability is. Most people like to smile, to laugh, or to enjoy a listening experience. Humor adds sparkle and interest to a speech. Humor when used should be good willed and not given in a manner to show how witty you are.

It is probably impossible to catalog humor completely. Here I have listed the 7 kinds of humor commonly used in public speaking.

Turn of Phrase
In this type of humor, you get the laugh by starting to make a serious point in one direction and suddenly an unexpected meaning is revealed. Mark Twain used this technique when he said that “youth is such a wonderful thing, it is shame to waste it on children.”

The Pun
A word is used to evoke a serious meaning and then used in a completely different meaning altogether. The second meaning gives a whole new viewpoint to the speaker’s remarks. To be funny the meaning should not be stretched too far or it will evoke groans rather than smiles. For example, the organiser of an event may ask a member of the audience if the guest speaker was an able speaker. The member of the audience may reply “Yes, the guest speaker was able. He was able to stand up all the way through his speech.”

Exaggeration
This is where a small thing is made into a larger important issue. This is similar to the how a cartoonist will exaggerate the features of a politician for effect.

Understatement
This is the opposite of exaggeration, and words are used to underplay the importance of an event or issue.

Irony
Here, the face value meaning of the words is different to the intended meaning. An example is the phrase “as pleasant and relaxed as a coiled rattlesnake” used by Kurt Vonnegut in one of his books.

Sarcasm
Sarcasm is a cutting form of wit and should be used with care. To be funny the audience should not have much sympathy for the intended target. If they do it will not work in your favor.

Satire
Satire is an attack upon something worded in a way as to be pleasant but clear in its meaning. Will Rogers at a bankers convention asked “I have often wondered where the Depositor’s hold their convention.”

To be funny, the humor should be said in a spirit of fun. However, for best effect, humor should be unannounced and told with a straight face (you don’t want to laugh before your audience does). It requires more practice and preparation than other parts of your speech. The humor will die if you fumble over words or stumble during the punch line. In public speaking, as it is with conversation, the telling of humor should be effortless and natural.

To be effective in public speaking the humor should be relevant to the points being made. It is woven into the fabric of the speech. With practice and preparation it is possible to employ the 7 types of humor listed, regardless of how dry and shy you maybe.

……………………………….

Author: Edward Hope … Add interest to your your public speaking and conversation with “The Art of Great Conversation.” To claim your free preview visit http://www.SelfConfidentSpeaking.com

How to Give an Impromptu Speech

Did you know that more people fear giving a public speech than dying? And for many of those who are uneasy about speaking in front of an audience, the impromptu speech is the scariest type of speech. The lack of preparation time can exponentially increase how much anxiety you feel before and during the talk. However, by following these tips you can be better prepared to give your next impromptu speech-which itself allows for virtually no preparation:

1. Don’t rush.
Just because your preparation time is short, doesn’t mean that you need to (or should) rush in giving the speech. Your audience will likely understand the situation, so go ahead and tell them when you haven’t had time to prepare for the speech, and when you need some time to gather your thoughts.

2. Keep the speech short and to the point.
Since you’ve had minimal or no time to prepare for speech, the speech isn’t expected to be as long as a “War and Peace” audio book. Instead, mention the main points you want to cover, without going into a lengthy explanations. Typically, an impromptu speech should only last a few minutes or so. Don’t spend time talking about what you’re going to say, or reviewing what you’ve said-just get to it!

3. Stick to the facts.
As many celebrities will tell you, impromptu speeches can be embarrassing. In particular, make sure that everything you include in your impromptu speech is factual. If you’re uncertain whether information is factual, then don’t include it in your speech. Also, if you share personal experiences, then qualify them as such.

4. Talk about what you know.
This will help to avoid any possible missteps when giving your impromptu speech. Avoid addressing issues that you’re unfamiliar with, as the results could potentially be devastating.

5. Choose a general direction.
While you’ll have to do this on-the-fly, this step will help to shape your impromptu speech. For instance, do you want the tone of the talk to be formal or informal? Do you want to add humor to your talk (and just as important–would it be appropriate?)? Address these questions as you walk up to a podium or wait for the audience to settle down.

6. Create a rapport with the audience.
You could include a humorous story or discuss information that the whole audience can relate to. The key is to capture the audience’s attention, and then hold it until you utter your last word. One of the most effective methods is to establish the talk’s tone early.

7. Create a skeleton outline whenever possible.
Sometimes you’ll have some time to do some preparation for your speech. When you’re in that situation, take a few minutes to create a skeleton outline. That will help to cover the main points you want to discuss, and to keep the impromptu speech as organized as possible.

While many of us are petrified about giving impromptu speeches, taking these steps can make you confident about giving them. In mere minutes you can create a lasting impression.

…………………………………………………..

Author: Graeme Renwall has been writing articles for nearly 3 years. He enjoys keeping fit and music but his current passion is parenting. Take a look at his selection of educational toys including Little Tikes Swings and the Little Tikes Jungle Gym, both of which stimulate the mind and help to keep children active.

Friday freebie – “Ten Secrets to Keeping Audience Attention”

Have you grabbed a copy of my free report yet? …”Ten Secrets to Keeping Audience Attention”

… how to keep your audience focussed on you and your message and not on their iphones, laptops or neighbours
… 3 ways to design your presentation so that each person in the audience feels you care especially about them
… how to avoid the panic of realising you are losing your audience
and more!

You can get it here =>http://bit.ly/y9RI0s

Thought for Thursday – public speaking

Mere words are cheap and plenty enough, but ideas that rouse and set multitudes thinking come as gold from the mines.

A. Owen Penny

Build public speaking confidence with your own warm-up routine

Don’t let nerves wreck your presentation.

All good speakers suffer from nervousness to some degree, but they are good, and not a quaking mess on stage, because they know what to do with the nerves – how to minimise their impact and how to channel then for success.

A warm-up routine can be built to give you public speaking confidence. This is the set of behaviours that will work best for you so that when you begin your presentation you feel confident.

Request this set of tips and build your own warm up routine. => http://bit.ly/rgD93S

Present like Steve Jobs – inspiring video

A timely video, this, given the tragic passing of Steve Jobs this week.

Speaker and author, Carmine Gallo, has written a book on the presentation secrets of Steve Jobs. Now he has created this video with the main points form the book.

I included it in this week’s public speaking ezine … just scroll down. http://bit.ly/cQBbVn

Amy Tan on Creativity

From the public speaking ezine this week – you can access it here => http://bit.ly/cQBbVn until 9th June.