Keep Your Marketing Simple and More Effective With This 6-Step Model

Whether you are a professional in a solo-practice or own a small business, chances are you feel overwhelmed when it comes to marketing. While you may be an expert in your field, consistently attracting new clients probably isn’t one of your strengths.

Here is just a short list of “marketing culprits” that are likely keeping your business from reaching its full potential:

Unclear Target Market. It absolutely makes my marketing blood boil when I hear “our service can help everyone”. How on Earth do you find everyone?
Confusing, Self-Centered Marketing Message. Since the early 1900 marketing geniuses like Claude Hopkins have been telling us that shouting “we are the best, come buy from us” doesn’t work – no matter how loud you scream! Amazingly, over 90% of all marketing materials out there are doing exactly that!
‘Hop-And-Drop’ Approach. Any worthwhile skill takes practice. Yet most small business owners abandon each marketing tactic after just one try, without giving themselves a chance to get good at it. It’s like a running rabbit – switching direction with every hop!
On and off approach. Spending a lot of time and effort on marketing when the business is slow, but then giving up on almost all promotional activities when business gains momentum!
Not Preaching To The Choir. Most businesses make the mistake of chasing new markets all the time instead of maximizing profits using their existing database of current and prospective clients.

If you can put a “yes, guilty as charged” checkmark next to any of those statements, chances are you are not profiting from your business as much as you could. To help unleash the extra profits currently hidden in your business or practice here is a simple Five Step Marketing Model.

Networking Tip – the Elevator Pitch


Successful individuals are first, last, and always salespeople. They are constantly selling themselves and their ideas to investors, management, co-workers, vendors, and even their families.

An opportunity to sell yourself and/or your ideas can come up on the subway, in the checkout line at the grocery store, after your yoga class – just about anywhere. To be ready to make a useful connection at any time, it’s a good idea to be prepared with a short (one minute is ideal) self-promotional speech.
Known as an “elevator pitch” (because you can deliver it in the time it takes for a short elevator ride), it is meant to engage the interest of a potential contact/prospect.

Aside from introducing yourself and what you do, the elevator pitch has three important components: